Tuesday, July 29, 2008

UPDATED BOOK TOUR SCHEDULE

"BOOK TOUR" for REMEMBERING YANKEE STADIUM
(as of July 29, New York, New Jersey, Florida, New Hampshire)
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September 3 Wednesday/talk/signing 7:30 PM Barnes & Noble, 396 Ave. Americas NY (8th St.) (212) 674-8780
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September 4th, 7:45 PM Varsity Letters 302 Broome St. NYC 212-334-9676
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September 5th, 7pm Friday Book Revue 313 New York Avenue Huntington, NY 11743 Ph. 631-271-1442
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Sept. 20, 2008 / 7 p.m. Northshire Bookstore 4869 Main Street Manchester Center, VT 05255 802-362-3565
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September 26 afternoon Fall for the Book Festival George Mason University Fairfax, VA 22030 Phone: (703) 993-3986 FftB@gmu.edu www.fallforthebook.org
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October 10 7:00PM Friday, Borders 59th St & Park Avenue 212-980-6785
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October 11th. Dartmouth Bookstore, Hanover, NH (afternoon) bksdartmouth@bncollege.comOctober 22. Hanover Rotary Club, Noon, Hanover Inn.
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October 24, 25, St. Pete Times Festival of Reading, Tampa Bay, Florida
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November 8, 2008 Saturday 11:30 AM Books & Greetings 271 Livingston Street, Northvale,NJ 07647 201-784-2665
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December 4 Thursday 7PM /RJ JULIA, Madison, CT 800 747 3247 talk and signing

THE BOOK REVIEW "Baseball Bits" and other August reads . . .

"Baseball Bits" by Dan Schlossberg (Alpha/Penguin Group, $16.95, 253 pages) is a home run of a book dealing with as it does in an interesting, highly organized manner all kinds of facts, stats, trivia about the national pastime. The prolific Schlossberg , author now of 33 baseball books and more than 25,000 articles about the sport produced in an almost 40-year career, hasn't lost a step. Go for his newest.

We learn all kinds of things thumbing through the pages of this tome: Ken Griffey and son Jr. were the only father-son to go back to back with homers; the original lighting system for night baseball in Cincinnati cost $55,000; when Fenway was re-sodded in 1967, Carl Yastrzemski was able to have the bluegrass removed from left field to his lawn in Lynnfield, Massachusetts. These and other nuggets are all over "Baseball Bits." HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.

"Crazy Good" by Charles Leerhsen (Simon & Schuster, $26.00, 368 pages) evokes another time, another America, one that existed at the turn at the 20th century. It is about a real hero of that era - not Ty Cobb who made $12,000 in salary but Dan Patch (a horse) who made over a million dollars. Leerhsen skillfully weaves time and place and the world of the pacer, one that Dan Patch dominated. This is a "crazy good" read.

Mike Lupica, the storied New York Daily News columnist, is at it again in his other life as best-selling author of sports books for young readers. Coming soon from Penguin - - "Comeback Kids: "Safe at Home" and "Long Shot."

And for you fans of the Amazin's there are books right up your alley: "Mets By The Numbers by Joel Springer and Matthew Silverman(Skyhorse, $14.95, 304 pages, paper) and "The New York Mets" by Richard Grossinger (Frog, Ltd., North Atlantic Books, $16.95, 315 pages). Both books have much merit. The Springer/Silverman effort leaves no number unturned in this exhaustive study of the history (by uniform number) of the team from Flushing. The Grossinger effort serves up essays on what it has been like through the years to root for the Mets through good times and bad ones. The book has an attitude about it just as the Mets have always had.

From Welcome Books (Insight Editions) comes a welcome book – especially for fans of the team - - “San Francisco Giants: 50 Years” by Brian Murphy. Priced at $50.00 with hundreds of over-sized pages, this is lush, lavish, loving tribute to the team, its players and fans and management. With a foreword by Danny Glover and an afterword by Willie Mays, what could be better. This is a collectible worth collecting.
With the football season soon gearing up there is “Pro Football Prospectus: 2008 by Aaron Schatz (Plume, $21.95, 409 pages). If you want all you need to know about the pro grid game – this is the tome for you.
Another book of interest in a similar vein is “The Football Uncyclopedia” by Michael Kun and Adam Hof (Clerisy Press, $15.95, 272 pages). The book is billed as “a highly opinionated myth-busting guide to America’ game.” It is not quite that but it is very interesting reading and rummaging.

Harvey Frommer is his 33rd consecutive year of writing sports books. The author of 39 of them including “New York City Baseball,1947-1957″ and “Shoeless Joe and Ragtime Baseball”. His “Remembering Yankee Stadium: An Oral and Narrative History of the House that Ruth Built” (Abrams, Stewart, Tabori and Chang) will be published in 2008 as well as a reprint version of his “Shoeless Joe and Ragtime

REMEMBERING YANKEE STADIUM (The Definitive Book)
Fall 2008 (Abrams, STC) http://baseballguru.com/hfrommer/analysishfrommer50.html
http://bp1.blogger.com/_8WWV-eP4j-8/SDBUHdzKWPI/AAAAAAAAABU/AH5oRji7F0I/s1600-h/catalog.jpg

Call for Fenway Memories - now working on "Remembering Fenway Park" - will feature stories– first game attended, marker moments, odd events, tales of a special player at the Fens, architectural features... Please contact me by e-mail if you have something to contribute. Harvey

Frommer sports books are available direct from the author - discounted and autographed. FROMMER SPORTSNET (syndicated) reaches a readership in excess of one million and appears on Internet search engines for extended periods of time.

Sunday, July 27, 2008

Call for Fenway Memories

**Call for Fenway Memories - now working on "Remembering Fenway Park" - (companion to REMEMBERING YANKEE STADIUM) will feature stories­ first game attended, marker moments, odd events, tales of a special player at the Fens, architectural features... Please contact me by e-mail if you have something to contribute.

Wednesday, July 23, 2008

UPDATED BOOK TOUR SCHEDULE

Harvey Frommer "BOOK TOUR" for
REMEMBERING YANKEE STADIUM
(as of July 23)

Harvey Frommer "BOOK TOUR" for REMEMBERING YANKEE STADIUM
(as of July 25)
September 3 Wednesday/talk/signing 7:30 PM Barnes & Noble, 396 Ave. Americas NY (8th St.) (212) 674-8780

September 4th, 7:45 PM Varsity Letters 302 Broome St. NYC 212-334-9676

September 5th, 7pm Friday Book Revue 313 New York Avenue Huntington, NY 11743 Ph. 631-271-1442

Sept. 20, 2008 / 7 p.m. Northshire Bookstore 4869 Main Street Manchester Center, VT 05255 802-362-3565


September 26 afternoon Fall for the Book Festival George Mason University Fairfax, VA 22030 Phone: (703) 993-3986 FftB@gmu.edu www.fallforthebook.org

October 10 7:00PM Friday, Borders 59th St & Park Avenue 212-980-6785
October 11th. Dartmouth Bookstore, Hanover, NH (afternoon) bksdartmouth@bncollege.com

October 24, 25, St. Pete Times Festival of Reading, Tampa Bay, Florida

November 1, 2008 Saturday 11:30 AM Books & Greetings 271 Livingston Street, Northvale,NJ 07647 201-784-2665

December 4 Thursday 7PM /RJ JULIA, Madison, CT 800 747 3247 talk and signing
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Tuesday, July 22, 2008

Yankee Stadium Fire Sale




It is not exactly what one would refer to as a fire sale. Nevertheless, all the ingredients are there - - making an extra buck, capitalizing on people’s nostalgia and their desire to get a piece of the action, the right timing . . .

From all reports the New York Yankees are poised to profit from selling off parts and pieces of 85-year-old Yankee Stadium before it is no more. What will be on the selling block remains pure speculation. But the famous blue plastic seats seem fair game. Derek Jeter’s locker, used by him for his 14-year career could fetch $50,000 to $100,000 if the Yankees decide to auction it. At a hundred bucks a pop, pieces of the white frieze plastic replica running around the top of the bleacher's billboards would fetch a pretty penny or two or three.

And there is so much more – railings, pitching rubber, jock straps, uniforms, furniture from George Steinbrenner’s office. . . .

We have been here before but in a much less hyper way. That was when Yankee Stadium was renovated and refurbished after the 1973 season and re-opened again in 1975.

The final game in the “old Yankee Stadium was September 30, 1973.

DUKE SIMS: I caught that last game for the Yankees. It was only at the moment of the final out when I saw the crowd hit the field that I went "Whoa! They want souvenirs." It seemed there were thousands of people, all in a frenzy, tearing up everything, even scooping dirt from the ground. I was right at home plate. If I were smart, I would have grabbed it.

DAN MARENGO: By the sixth inning of that last game, all you heard was hammers. When the game finally ended, people jumped out of the stands trying to get anything that was not nailed down. They even took stuff that was: second base, sod, signs, advertising paraphernalia, chairs. Using tools my father had brought along, my friend Jerry and I took the chairs we had been sitting on. But we saw people carrying off rows of seats.

The Stadium was chaos, a free for all to get souvenirs. People had come not only to see the last game but to take pieces of the Stadium, and they were tearing it apart. Back then, they didn't have that much security.

JOEY COOPERMAN: I took the wooden chair I had been sitting on. Heck, nobody stopped me. People were wandering around with chairs. It was like a riot broke loose. Phil Rizzuto, on the broadcast, was very, very upset that somebody stole second base.

Afterwards, a more civilized disposition of Yankee artifacts was organized. The bat racks and bullpen steps were donated to the Smithsonian. Babe Ruth's widow received home plate; Lou Gehrig's widow was given first base. George Steinbrenner loaned a group of seats for the audience to the producers of a new television show: "Saturday Night Live." (Never returned, they remain in use to this day.) Those seats that had escaped the free-for-fall following the final game were sold to ex-players and fans.

PHIL SPERANZA: I went down with three friends and we all bought seats, thirteen dollars each, the old wooden seats, all blue, the ones that when fans banged on them, an echo would go through the Stadium. I also picked up a one-piece grounds crew uniform which had the Yankee logo on the back for about eight dollars.

JIM BOUTON: I bought a whole bunch of stuff: pictures, chairs which I have in my basement right now, a stool from the clubhouse --Babe Ruth used to sit on a stool like that.

TRACY NIEPORENT: My brother Drew and I got ourselves a chair for just ten bucks. It had iron stanchions and was very heavy. We'd come up to the Stadium by subway and now had to climb that damn El on 161st Street to get back home. When we did, we found a piece of petrified gum underneath the chair. At first, I thought to scrape it off. But then I thought it might have been there when Joe DiMaggio had his 56th game hitting streak.

SETH SWIRSKY: I got one of the seats. It has the original paint on it, that particular blue and the slats in the back. I sit in it in my house now, and I think about whoever sat in this seat over the years

The 1973 season marked an end of an era whose time was captured by Bob Sheppard in an elegiac ode:

Farewell, old Yankee Stadium!
You've filled these fifty years
With a treasury of memories
Some laughter, thrills and tears.
Farewell, old Yankee Stadium!
We'll miss your graceful sweep...
The far fa├žade...that triple deck...
That centerfield so deep.
Farewell, old Yankee Stadium!
We'll miss you while at Shea;
But we'll be waiting anxiously
For your next Opening Day.

The 1973 "Fire Sale" of artifacts and mementos sold off by Invirex of Long Island, the firm hired to dismantle the Stadium, netted:
$30,000: lights purchased by Oasaka baseball team of Japan
$10,000: foul poles purchased by Osaka baseball team of Japan
$500: box seats, enlarged photos of Babe Ruth on Babe Ruth Day, and clubhouse stool purchased by Jim Bouton
$300: sign "Gate A"
$200: huge picture of a young Joe DiMaggio
$150: photo of Dan Larsen making last pitch of perfect game
$100: turnstiles
$75: locker room scale
$50: an old duffel bag that belonged to Joe Pepitone
Box seats: $20
$10: groundskeeper's uniform
$5: trays of hot dog vendors
$3: Men's' lavatory "In" sign
$3: A sheet of World Series tickets, unused from the 1972 Yankees' near miss
50 cents: sign: "Scout Admission – 50 Cents"
Total proceeds from that sale were $300,000.
How much the 2008 “fire sale” will net is beyond imagining.
==
Harvey Frommer is the author of REMEMBERING YANKEE STADIUM: AN ORAL AND NARRATIVE HISTORY OF THE HOUSE THAT RUTH BUILT (The Definitive Book) Fall 2008 (Abrams, Stewart, Tabori & Chang).

Tuesday, July 15, 2008

THE BOOK REVIEW: "The Greatest Game" and other Very Interesting Reads



Yankees Versus Red Sox makes for always interesting reading. In the interests of full disclosure that was the subject of what many call the definitive book on the subject "RED SOX VS YANKEES: THE GREAT RIVALRY written by yours truly and his son Frederic Frommer.


So it was with great interest that I read "The Greatest Game: The Yankees, the Red Sox and the Playoff of '78'" by Richard Bradley (Simon and Schuster, $25.00, 286 pages).

Even though the book is focused on one aspect of the "Rivalry," it does not disappoint. It is in fact riveting reading. Bradley interviewed so many to create this montage of wonderful memories. Even some of those who were actually on the field that fateful October 2, 1978,a warm day at Fenway when "Bucky hit the tin" are here telling the old stories with vivid recall: Bucky Dent, Fred Lynn, Lou Piniella, Goose Gossage, Carl Yastrzemski, et al.

"It's going to be Yaz, Goose Gossage thought. In the bottom on the ninth, it's going to be me against Yaz," that is how "The Greatest Game: The Yankees, the Red Sox and the Playoff of '78'" begins and it never lets up.

Still in a Yankee vein is "Rumor in Town" by Matt Dahlgren (Woodlyn Lane, California, $24.95, 300 pages). It is a grandson's paean and homage and keeping of a promise to his grandfather – former pinstriper Babe Dahlgren. Matt Dahlgren completed the book his grandfather who passed away in 1996 was working on. Rich in anecdote, filled with perceptions of players and long ago days of the national pastime, "Rumor in Town" is a winner.

"FAR FROM HOME" by Tim Wendell and Jose Luis Villegas (National Geographic, $28.00, 159 pages) is all about as its sub-title proclaims "Latino Baseball Players Chasing the American Dream." Fusing excellent narrative, interviews with top name former players like Orlando Cepeda, Minnie Minoso, Luis Tiant, Sammy Sosa and 100 full color and black and white photos – the book begins in 1878 when Cuba was the host to the first league in Caribbean.

In the same vein from the University of Illinois comes "Viva Baseball" by Samuel O. Regaldo (paper) all about Latin major leaguers and their special hunger in the words of the sub-title. The book does not shy away from controversy, from racism directed against Latino players even today.

For those into the history of the national pastime expounded by an expert "Baseball: A History of America's Game" third edition by Benjamin G. Rader (University of Illinois Press, paper) is the book for you.

"The Smart Girl's Guide to Sports" by Liz Hartman Musiker (Plume, $15.00, 332 pages) is as its sub-title cleverly declares "an essential handbook for women who don't know a slam dunk from a grand slam." Recommended.

MOST NOTABLE: "Netherland" by Joseph O' Neill (Pantheon, $23.95, 256 pages) is not exactly a sports book but a brilliant and lyrical and inventive novel set against the backdrop of post 9/11 New York City and the game of cricket. It is a joy to read and just a perfect treat for hazy and humid summer days evoking a time and a place so expertly.

WORTH OWNING: The 2008 Hank Greenberg 75th Anniversary Edition of Jewish Major Leaguers Baseball Cards. Contact info: JML,104 Greenlawn Avenue Newton, MA 02459, 617-969-6244, Martin_Abramowitz@yahoo.com





Harvey Frommer, now in his 33rd consecutive year of writing sports books, is the author of 39 of them including the classics: "New York City Baseball,1947-1957" and "Red Sox Vs Yankee: The Great Rivalry." Frommer's REMEMBERING YANKEE STADIUM (Abrams, Stewart, Tabori and Chang) an oral/narrative history will be published in September as well as a reprint version of his SHOELESS JOE AND RAGTIME BASEBALL.

Frommer sports books are available direct from the author - discounted and autographed.
FROMMER SPORTSNET (syndicated) reaches a readership in the millions and appears on Internet search engines for extended periods of time.





"BOOK TOUR" for REMEMBERING YANKEE STADIUM
(as of July 16)



September 3rd Wednesday/talk/signing 7:30 PM Barnes & Noble, 396 Ave. Americas NY (8th St.) (212) 674-8780



September 4th, 7:45 PM Varsity Letters 302 Broome St. NYC 212-334-9676



September 5th, 7pm Friday Book Revue 313 New York Avenue Huntington, NY 11743 Ph. 631-271-1442



Sept. 20, 2008 / 7 p.m. Northshire Bookstore 4869 Main Street Manchester Center, VT 05255 802-362-3565



September 26 afternoon Fall for the Book Festival George Mason University Fairfax, VA 22030 Phone: (703) 993-3986 FftB@gmu.edu http://www.fallforthebook.org/



October 10,7pm/ BORDERS 59th &Park (212-980-6785)



October 11th. Dartmouth Bookstore, Hanover, NH (afternoon) bksdartmouth@bncollege.com



November 1st Saturday 11:30 AM Books & Greetings 271 Livingston St., Northvale, NJ 201-784-2665



December 4th Thursday 7PM /RJ JULIA, Madison, CT 800 747-3247 talk and signing

Sunday, July 13, 2008

Remembering Bobby Murcer



Bobby Murcer became a Yankee just after the glory times of the franchise, 1949-64, and I followed his baseball exploits along with millions of others. There was always a pleasing presence about the man.

It was a stunner when he was traded on October 21, 1974 to the San Francisco Giants for Bobby Bonds, Barry’s dad. That was where I entered the story.

The summer of 1975 I was traveling about with the Philadelphia Phillies (The Mets had informed the League Office that they could not host me) writing my first book - A Baseball Century: the First Hundred Years of the National league.

It was a very interesting experience going from city to city and interviewing players, managers, coaches, owners. I used a big boom box tape recorder and an even bigger briefcase to store my tapes, credentials, media guide and notes. I truly was a “beginning author.”

I arrived at San Francisco’s Candlestick Park and interviewed the long-time owner of the Giants Horace Stoneham and his long-time publicist Garry Schumacher and other Giants.

Then I came upon Bobby Murcer. He was not a part of the National League story, not a part of the subject matter of the book I was writing and was so honed in on.

But I decided to talk to him anyway and get some of his thoughts. Affable, smiling, a bit out of uniform in the garb of the Giants, Murcer was a pleasure to be with.

I thanked him for his time and continued on in my relentless pace interviewing in the locker room and on the field. I must have stopped for a snack or something and came back to where I thought I had put my tape recorder and tapes.

They were not around. Weeks of work – not around. I started to panic. I asked everyone – no one had seen them. I re-traced my interview steps – no luck.

I was out on the windy Candlestick Park field and spied Bobby Murcer and explained my plight. He said something about never letting things important to you out of your sight. He suggested we go back into the dressing room to look.

He reached up and into his locker. “Here they are,” he smiled “Someone must have put them there,” he continued in that distinctive Oklahoma drawl. “Let me autograph a baseball for you to make your day a little better.”

I always suspected that Bobby Murcer was the “someone.” He was always the practical joker. I’ll never forgot that day and that moment of panic and the lesson Bobby Murcer taught me.


Harvey Frommer, now in his 33rd consecutive year of writing sports books, is the author of 39 of them including the classics: "New York City Baseball,1947-1957" and "Red Sox Vs Yankee: The Great Rivalry.” Frommer’s REMEMBERING YANKEE STADIUM (Abrams, Stewart, Tabori and Chang) an oral/narrative history will be published in September as well as a reprint version of his SHOELESS JOE AND RAGTIME BASEBALL.
Frommer sports books are available direct from the author - discounted and autographed. FROMMER SPORTSNET (syndicated) reaches a readership in the millions and appears on Internet search engines for extended periods of time.





Monday, July 07, 2008

REMEMBERING YANKEE STADIUM: ALL-STAR GAMES



All kinds of hype, hoopla and probably histrionics will be part of the scene for Yankee Stadium's final All-Star Game set for the 15th of July 2008. This will be the fourth mid summer classic staged at the "House That Ruth Built."


The first one at the Stadium took place on the eleventh of July 1939 before 62,892. The big ballpark in the Bronx was chosen as the site to coincide with the World's Fair of 1939. As the American League lineups were announced, a fan bellowed: "Make Joe McCarthy play an All-Star American League team. We can beat them, but we can't beat the Yankees!"

Marse Joe McCarthy paid the fan no heed. Six starters were Yankees: Red Rolfe, Bill Dickey, George Selkirk, Joe Gordon, Red Ruffing and Joe DiMaggio. Other Yankees on the AL squad included Frank Crosetti, Lefty Gomez and Johnny Murphy. In all, counting McCarthy, there were ten Yankees on the All-Star team. The half dozen position starters played the entire game.
Lou Gehrig was there, too, an honorary member of the American League team. It was just a week after his “luckiest man” speech at the Stadium.

McCarthy pitched Red Ruffing for three innings, then brought in Tommy Bridges and closed out with rookie, twenty-year-old Bob Feller who was touched for but one hit in his 3 2/3 innings. Later he said: "I was never nervous on a pitching mound. I just reared back and let them go."

One of the big moments of the game for the home town fans was Joe DiMaggio’s fifth inning dinger highlighting the 3-1 American League triumph. After the All-Star break, the Yanks went on a tear winning 35 of 49 games.

From 1959 to 1962, Major League Baseball conducted two All-Star Games. Yankee Stadium hosted baseball's second All-Star Game in three days. On July 13th Seven Yankees were on the American League squad: starters Whitey Ford, Yogi Berra, Mickey Mantle , Roger Maris and Bill Skowron. The Yankee reserves were Jim Coates and Elston Howard.

The first All-Star game of 1960 had been played two day’s before. Perhaps that was why attendance was just 38,362 for this second one. Whitey Ford started for the American League against Pittburgh’s Vernon Law. Al Lopez was the AL manager and Walt Alston was the National League pilot. For many New York baseball fans, the special appeal of the game was the return of the great Willie Mays to the city he starred in. The “Say Hey Kid” went three for four – one of his hits was a home run. The National League prevailed, 6-0.

On July 19, 1977 Yankee Stadium was once more the site of the All-Star Game. The teams prepared to square off before 56,683. The managerial matchup was Billy Martin of the Yankees against Sparky Anderson of Cincinnati. Joe DiMaggio was the AL Honorary Captain and Willie Mays had that role for the National League. DAN MARENG0: I had a seat behind home plate in the upper deck. I knew the press always made a big deal about the feud between Munson and Fisk. I looked down and the two guys were around the batting cage enjoying a conversation
with each other, smiling. What do you believe?

Willie Randolph recalled: “I was a young kid in that All-Star Game, in front of my hometown fans, my family, playing in the game with guys I had grown up idolizing like Reggie Jackson and Rod Carew.”

ROD CAREW: To play in the All-Star game with my mom there in the stands was a thrill. Just being in Yankee Stadium was an incentive to do well. The fans are special. They'll root for you if they like you. I think they knew I was from New York so they gave me a good ovation that day
and every time I played in the Stadium. Pitcher Jim Palmer took the mound for the AL. He lasted two innings, gave up five runs on five hits, walked one and was the losing pitcher. Joe Morgan led off the game with a home run.

DENNIS ECKERSLEY: I was like 22 years old. Before the game, Billy Martin -- who was a nut but I loved him -- told me I was going to pitch the fourth through sixth innings. Well, our starter Jim Palmer couldn’t get out of the third. They lit him up. I came in a little earlier and pitched two scoreless innings.

The National League prevailed in 1977, 7-5, and the 48th All-Star game was a matter of record.

Now Yankee Stadium, the place of mystique and memories, awaits its fourth and final All Star Game. All kinds of history will be made and millions will be watching.

Harvey Frommer is his 33rd consecutive year of writing sports books His REMEMBERING YANKEE STADIUM, an oral/narrative history (Abrams, Stewart, Tabori and Chang) will be published in September.

The Harvey Frommer "BOOK TOUR" for REMEMBERING YANKEE STADIUM (as of July 7)

September 3 Wednesday/talk/signing 7:30 PM Barnes & Noble, 396 Ave. Americas NY (8th St.) (212) 674-8780


September 4th, 7:45 PM Varsity Letters 302 Broome St. NYC 212-334-9676


September 5th, 7pm Friday Book Revue 313 New York Avenue Huntington, NY 11743 Ph. 631-271-1442


Sept. 20, 2008 / 7 p.m. Northshire Bookstore 4869 Main Street Manchester Center, VT 05255 802-362-3565


September 26 afternoon Fall for the Book Festival George Mason University Fairfax, VA 22030 Phone: (703) 993-3986 FftB@gmu.edu www.fallforthebook.org


October 11th. Dartmouth Bookstore, Hanover, NH (afternoon) bksdartmouth@bncollege.com


November 1, 2008 Saturday 11:30 AM Books & Greetings 271 Livingston Street, Northvale,NJ 07647 201-784-2665


December 4 Thursday 7PM /RJ JULIA, Madison, CT 800 747 3247 talk and signing